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Wetlands Watch Celebrates the 2011 Wetland Stewards Interns
Wetland Stewards Celebrate GraduationOn June 3rd, WWW held a reception to honor this year's Wetland Stewards interns. Attendees included friends and family of the interns as well as docents who worked with the stewards throughout the year. During the reception, the Stewards taught the audience about the snakes, birds, plants, and aquatic invertebrates of the wetlands, gave tours of the cultural history garden, and told wetlands stories. Laura Hofmeister presented Rosemary Alvarez with a $1000 scholarship for her dedication to educating students and the community about Watsonville's wetlands. Read more about Laura's scholarship. Congratulations 2011 Wetland Stewards, you will be missed!
Special Presentation — Keeping the Traditions Alive

Linda YamanePlease join us for a special evening of stories, baskets and songs by Ohlone basketweaver, singer, writer and storyteller Linda Yamane. Linda traces her ancestry to the Rumsien Ohlone of the Monterey area and has spent 25 years researching Ohlone history and reviving Rumsien language, song, folklore, basketry, boat making, and other ancestral traditions. This presentation, sponsored by the Watsonville Wetlands Watch, is on Wednesday, July 20 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm. It is free but please reserve a seat. Click for more information.

Explore Nature on Wetlands Alive! Tour
Great White Egret in flight over sloughThere is an abundance of birds, native plants, and other wonders to see in the wetlands. Bring your friends and join us on a family-oriented tour of the wetlands and our Wetlands Educational Resource Center (map/directions). The upcoming Wetlands Alive! Tour dates are Saturday, July 16; Sunday, July 24; Sunday, Aug. 7; and Saturday, August 20; starting at 10 a.m. Tours are free, but please call 831-345-1226 or email kathyfieb@yahoo.com by Friday noon before the tour to reserve a place. For more information, click here.
Students Study
the Chemistry of Wetlands 

Students working at desk This spring around 200 students from Pajaro Valley High School chemistry classes stepped out of the classroom to learn about the chemistry of wetlands with Watsonville Wetlands Watch. During the field trip to the Department of Fish and Game preserve at West Struve Slough, students learned how nitrogen and oxygen cycle through healthy and unhealthy wetlands. The students then tested the water for dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations. Read whole article to learn the results.

See Rare Blooming Tarplant
at our Annual Picnic
Photo of Santa Cruz Tarplant in flower (Holocarpha macradenia)
© 2001 John Game.
© 1995-2011 UC Regents. All rights reserved.
You and your family and friends are invited to join us for an old-fashioned picnic/potluck at Tarplant Hill on Saturday, August 6 from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. We will celebrate summer with good food, good friends, bird watching, and a plant walk to see native plants, including blooming tarplant. Bring a dish or drinks to share, picnic plates, cups, flatware, etc., and a blanket or beach chair to sit on. We will provide tables for the food buffet and binoculars. Tarplant Hill is across the street from Landmark School, 235 Ohlone Parkway, in Watsonville; park in the Landmark Elementary parking lot. Please RSVP to Kathy Fieberling at kathyfieb@yahoo.com or 831-345-1226. Map.
Join our Wetlands Stewards….by Contributing to the Watch

Wetland Stewards Group Shot OutdoorsOur departing Wetlands Stewards have made a significant contribution to the Watsonville wetlands through their work with the Watsonville Wetlands Watch. You too can make a contribution to help protect, restore, and foster appreciation of the wetlands. Contribute online by going to our website or by sending a donation in the mail to WWW, P.O. Box 1239, Freedom, CA 95019. Contributions are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS rules for non-profit organizations and are greatly appreciated.
Watsonville Wetlands Watch advocates for wetland issues, educates elementary, middle, and high school students, restores degraded habitats, preserves what remains whole, and teaches appreciation for the unique beauty and life of the Pajaro Valley wetlands. In cooperation with numerous other agencies, we support studies of and planning for these sites.