Contents
The Changing of the Guard
Kris Beall Retires as Executive Director
Photo of Watsonville Wetlands Watch retiring executive directory Kris Beall

2011 is proving to be a year of change for Watsonville Wetlands Watch with recent retirements and appointments of personnel in key management positions of Executive Director and President of the Board of Directors.

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Board President and Retired Executive Director Kris Beall



Photo of new Watsonville Wetlands Watch executive director, Craig BreonMy First Day
by Craig Breon,
Executive Director, WWW

My first day on the job was President’s Day, February 21st. The staff had a holiday, so Kris Beall, our recently retired executive director, and I had the place to ourselves...but for one rewarding interruption.

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New Executive Director
Craig Breon

 

 

Wetlands Alive! Tours Start Up
People on Watsonville Wetlands Watch Tour near Watsonville Sloughs

Our spring season of Wetlands Alive! Tours begins this month. The tour dates are Saturday, April 9th, Sunday, April 17th, Saturday, May 14th, and Sunday, May 22nd, starting at 10 a.m. Bring your friends and join us on a fun, family-oriented tour of the wetlands and our Wetlands Educational Resource Center (map/directions). Tours are free, but please call or email kathyfieb@yahoo.com, 345-1226, by Friday noon before the tour to reserve a place. For more information, click here.

Presentation: An Evening in the World of Bats

Enjoy an evening discovering the biology of our local bat species! On Thursday, May 19, the Watch is hosting popular educator and biologist Bruce Elliott's in-depth look at bats. Learn how bats fly through dense vegetation, locate their prey and other sustenance, breed, and many other "Gee Whiz!" facts about their remarkable way of life. To learn more, click here.

Lasiurus cinereus; Hoary Bat.  © 2005 William Leonard
© 2005 William Leonard. Lasiurus cinereus; Hoary Bat
Students & Volunteers Help with Red-legged Frog Pond Habitat Restoration

Watsonville Wetlands Watch has been working for several months to complete the native plant installment around the only California Red-legged frog breeding pond in the Watsonville sloughs. In early March the Watch, aided by students and volunteers, completed the planting of over 3000 native plants, creating a habitat of Coast Live Oaks, coastal terrace prairie made up of perennial grasses mixed with wildflowers, native scrub with California Wild Rose and California Blackberry, and wet meadows of rushes and sedges surrounding the sediment basin and pond. Read more.

Americorps interns with the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County and service learners from CSUMB help Mary and John finish putting the mulch in place before planting begins.

Americorps interns with the Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County and service learners from CSUMB help Mary and John finish putting the mulch in place before planting begins. (03/2011)

 

Would you like to support our work?
Young students birding with Watsonville Wetlands Watch on ground overlooking West Struve Slough

You can help the Watsonville Wetlands Watch protect, restore and foster appreciation of the wetlands of Watsonville. Contribute online by going to our website; or send a donation in the mail to WWW, P.O. Box 1239, Freedom, CA 95019. Contributions are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS rules for non-profit organizations and are greatly appreciated.

Watsonville Wetlands Watch advocates for wetland issues, educates elementary, middle, and high school students, restores degraded habitats, preserves what remains whole, and teaches appreciation for the unique beauty and life of the Pajaro Valley wetlands. In cooperation with numerous other agencies, we support studies of and planning for these sites.